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William H. Jones

In 1971, Jones won the Pulitzer Prize for local reporting for a series of articles about police officers engaging in a conspiracy to direct hospital calls to private ambulance companies. The series revealed mistreatment of ambulance patients, especially poor people. In order to research the story, Jones worked as an ambulance driver and received first-aid training.  Following publication of Jones’ investigation in the Chicago Tribune, 16 people were indicted including the presidents of Chicago’s two largest ambulance companies.

A year after winning the Pulitzer, Jones became the Tribune’s city editor. He went on to become assistant managing editor, managing editor-news and then managing editor. He served as a Pulitzer juror as well. He died at the age of 43 in 1982.